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Full tank

A few months back I signed up online to enjoy a day trip to Fort Portal to relax with other missionary women. When I filled the questionnaire out I thought that it was just another one of those things you just fill out, but no one really looks at. They asked what I would want if I could have one gift for up to $100, I thought well I don’t actually need anything.  I would like a lot of little things like makeup and food items, but I had never really been able to look at things that cost that much; let alone one thing. I admit I googled items that cost under $100 for women. I picked a Kindle white book… fast forward a few weeks later and we were robbed my list suddenly was larger than one item. But another thing that I didn’t expect was that when they asked me to share about myself and what I needed prayer for…they would actually hear me and mean what they said. I emailed my “prayer partner” and told her what happened and she prayed for me.

I got to meet her this week and it was evident more than ever that not only was she praying for me, but so were hundreds of other people…people that I had never met; people I most likely will never meet.

The drive to Fort Portal started with me taking a boda to meet a woman who I had never met who would be driving me and another person to Fort Portal.  I ended up riding with an amazing Australian lady who is passionate about conservation, people and God. I also rode with an equally amazing Brazilian woman who has two sons that I actually know from teaching at Acacia. We talked for the 5-hour car ride about some of our amazing adventures in Uganda and other nations we have served. After a very bumpy ride with no lunch and using the side of the rode as our commode we arrived at our retreat. We were greeted by smiling faces of women wearing matching shirts and handing us a new shirt, telling us we could sign up for two of the three services a massage, pedicure or haircut. We were then gifted with an envelope that was later to be explained that would be worth $100 to shop at the gift shop. (I thought oh great some African knickknacks) I was wrong there was makeup, jewelry, clothes, housewares goods, food, lotions…Then I met my prayer warrior, she gave me a hug and asked me how things were going at home. She then gave me a bag full of goodies and I mean full included was the Kindle that I asked for. Now if I stopped there one would say wow how amazing is that! Right.

But God is so good it wasn’t about the stuff. We got to have time to talk and share about ourselves and people listened and people prayed. We laughed together, prayed together, worshiped together and cried together. I met other missionaries with incredible stories of their ministries and what God is doing and their heartaches. I was able to lift of the name of Jesus Christ in worship with other women who understand what it means to be a wife, mom, missionary and woman in a land away from home. I was paired with a lovely lady I had never met, but when we met; we clicked.  We started laughing together from the start (we also had an early mishap with our glass door shattering all over the floor, and me not being able to figure out how to open the other door to get out). We sat together at the dinner table where the vets would have the stories and the visitors who were blessing us would ask us questions. It was nice to have inside jokes that only people living in Uganda would know (funny thing is we were from all over Uganda, but we all had similar experiences with the people, food and muzungu mentality).

The next morning, I got sick, it might have been something I ate or the big bug bite I got on my butt the night before; but I was not well. I had so many women praying for me, serving me, nursing me back to health. We were blessed with day two of gifts, services, food, fellowship, worship and prayer. We had a great morning together before it was time to say farewell to the other missionary women from around Uganda.  The women that I rode with were staying an extra night in a hostel that was also hosting the team of ladies that had been blessing us. This is where I want to share about some amazing people, organizations and accommodations that we encountered this week.  The host was “Go Be Love” and they were awesome this is the first year that they did this “Be loved” retreat and their plan is to be full time missionaries starting next year and they will be doing more events like this one in the future. We stayed at an amazing place in Fort Portal called “Kluges Farm” and it has amazing wonderful accommodations, buffet style food, pool (it was rainy so we didn’t get to use it, but it looked nice) and the staff was so amazing! Mercy for Mamas was our sponsor organization and they brought women from the U.S. to serve more than just us. They are a wonderful organization that work with expectant mothers and mothers by giving them medical help, information on prenatal services, “momma kits” and much more. These amazing women had so many skill sets and they have been serving Uganda for years. Check them out at http://www.mercyformamas.com Melissa Busby is an amazing woman! The hostel we stayed at for one night was also run by an amazing woman who could be my grandmother and kind of reminds me of her. She has been in Uganda for over 20 years at Y.E.S. Uganda where she serves HIV/Aids orphaned children and youth check out her ministry here at http://yesugandahostel.weebly.com/about-yes-uganda.html

Basically it was amazing, highly recommended especially for those of us that don’t get to visit home very often, it was a touch of home with the benefit of everyone understanding how exhausted you are, not expecting anything from you and loving on you the whole time! (oh and 5 hours wasn’t much in comparison to the 2 days it takes to get “home”) A big thank you for everyone that made it happen and for all the people who helped by donating the goodies that we received from the oils, popcorn, clothes, books and much more that were donated I am so blessed and thankful.

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Just so you know…

Matt and I are often perplexed about relationships we have and we see other missionaries have. We thought that maybe it was time we shared with our friends and family some helpful tips.

Just so you know… We know that each one of our friends and family members only want to help and at times don’t know what to say or do. We thought it would be a good way to just let you know what helps us in our time away from all of you. We love you so much and it gets lonely, we get jealous, feel guilt and just want to make everything perfect. Just know that no matter what we love you and even if you are the perfect supporter or may say something hurtful by accident we will always be family in Christ Jesus.

Things people say that hurt more than help missionary friends.

  1. When are you coming home to visit?

This can be hard for us to answer because we are “home” and we don’t know when our funds or time will make it possible to visit. We also really miss our old “home”, friends and family so this only puts more pressure on us to make it happen. 

  1. I could never do what you’re doing, it must be so hard.

Yes, it is hard and not everyone is called to go to a foreign land. However, everyone is called to do something and when your emphasis is that it is hard, it makes it even harder for us to cope with some of our fears of not being good enough for the job.

  1. Take more pictures.

We would love to share with you all that is going on especially through pictures but we are busy in the moment and to get out a camera might ruin what we are doing. You see some of the best moments in life are not captured through pictures. Just trust that I am trying and when I get a moment I will share, because what God is doing is awesome.

  1. Without you they would be so lost.

Well actually without me they will be just fine. God can use anyone to share his message. I am just so happy he chose me and I chose Him.

  1. Well don’t feel bad if you have to come home, you lasted a really long time.

Instead, just say I am praying for you as you go through this time of (fill in the blank). What you are doing is giving us a way out and we don’t need that; we need someone to hold us accountable to continue, even when it is hard.

Things people say, or don’t say that hurt missionary friends.

  1. Let’s Skype (but the connection is bad, time difference is a struggle, too busy)
  2. We will send you a care package (and they forget or realize it is really expensive to send stuff across the ocean)
  3. When you come home we will hang out (but then they are too busy or on vacation)
  4. We would love to hear about your ministry (but can’t find the right time to get together)
  5. We will tell all our friends about what you are doing (and then find it never comes up in conversations.)

What I am saying here is that we already know it probably won’t work out exactly how we would all like to stay connected when we are oceans apart; but don’t say it unless you are willing to work at making it happen. Let’s face it we are busy with life and even connecting with neighbors is hard. We get that; all we ask is you try and make an effort in the following ways.

Things that would help missionary friends.

  1. Praying by making an effort to find out what really is going on personally not just ministry.
  2. Contact Email, text, skype, WhatsApp, snail mail, Facebook message, packages (any contact that connects us to your family and life)
  3. Hospitality Make efforts to host us even if it means we just rest, play, eat or talk
  4. Share with others just as much as you share about the latest skincare, probiotic, wrap, oil or whatever you are interested in.
  5. Encourage us by telling us to keep going, to not give up, pray, support, communicate and stay connected.

Thank you

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Reaching the World

I came across a book that was donated to our center that wasn’t age appropriate for our kids to read but looked really interesting to me. Engaging Islam by Georges Houssney, I have been reading it on and off for a few months but during the holiday I decided to read it intentionally and have been rereading and highlighting as I go. I never really thought about ministering to Muslims in an intentional way. I figured well I am not a missionary in a Muslim nation, so I don’t have to worry about learning too much about Islam. Until one day when I was attending a church that had a guest speaker, the man came up to the front of the church with sunglasses on and I thought to myself he’s got swag. He even made a joke about how people were probably wondering who this rapper was standing up in church. He then proceeded to tell us his testimony of his life as a Muslim and how his dad was a polygamist and had several different wives and lots of children. To hear his testimony, click this link. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMWd7QnXY8E

Long story short he became a Christian against all odds and then became an evangelist. He was attacked for his faith with acid one Christmas eve after a very successful revival that he was a part of. He was left to die but through the grace of God was able to travel to Israel and have several surgeries to repair his face and ability to breathe normally again.

So I thought about how we engage with Muslim kids a lot and that they are not resistant to hearing the gospel. In fact, there is a family that attends Acacia an international Christian school that is Muslim. I wanted to learn more to equip myself for opportunities that may arise, so I started reading this book. One major thing that I have learned is to see Muslims “as people and not merely as representatives of a foreign religion, culture or political ideology. As people, they are products of those things, but they are also husbands and wives, children and students, truck drivers and heart surgeons. They are God’s lost children too, and he has given us the task of making disciples from among them, teaching them to obey everything that he has commanded.”

This past month Ramadan was taking place and since in Uganda there are many mosques I am often awakened by the “muezzin” the man in the mosque calling Muslims to prayer. I felt convicted to pray every time I heard the call for them, I felt like wow I should use this time to pray for them. In Uganda and other nations too, we are often labeled by what our family believes. For example, if our parents are Catholics we are Catholics, Muslims we are Muslims, and so on. Often times we don’t even know what we believe we just are “born” into the religion. There is a problem in this world were we often try and compare one religion with another and look for the similarities. The problem in this is that it leads to a pluralistic worldview that seeks to find similarities rather than differences and then we get confused and think all religions are relatively the same. As a Christian, I believe in the uniqueness of Christ and the distinction between the Christian faith and all other religions. The problem is that people are getting away from the truth of the Gospels and western Christian leaders often feel that we need to celebrate the similarities and not to emphasize the differences.

I think it is important to know who Muslims are and who they are not. The only real way to do this is to get to know some Muslims. Muslims are so diverse, just like Christians; they are people loved by God, not because they are Muslims, but because they are his creations. Here are some truths Islam is diverse because there are differences based on ethnic, national, tribal, linguistic and sectarian. Over 80% of Muslims are actually not Arabs and at least 10% of the Arab world is Christian. Not all people are Arabs in Arab countries there is a large Kurd population in Iraq among other countries with different ethnic groups. Muslims are descendants of Abraham through Ishmael- not completely true Muslims are all over the world in China, Korea, Italy, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, United States and the only thing they have in common is their faith. Other myths are that Muslims are impossible to reach, face persecution if they become Christian, hate America, and a negative view of Christianity, and Christians need to be secretive when ministering to Muslims.

“In his sermon to the Athenian philosophers, Paul argued that, ‘From one man he made every nation of men, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he determined the times set of them and the exact places where they should live. God did this so that men would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us.’” We are Christ’s ambassadors and we know that our mission is to bring the Gospel to all nations. We know that someday that all the nations will cry out, “How beautiful are the very feet of those who bring good news, proclaiming peace and salvation.” Isaiah 52:7. To fulfill the mission set before us we must engage Islam, and we cannot engage Islam until we engage Muslims.

I would encourage all Christians to first understand what they believe and to understand their own religion. This is an ongoing process as we read our Bible and continue to understand God and our relationship grows closer to Him. I then would suggest that we understand the differences and the uniqueness of Christianity and other world religions. What we learn through relationships with others is that we are all God’s creation and that we all need Christ. In life our goal should be to build relationships with others and point them to the ultimate relationship of one with Christ Jesus. The only real way we can do this is to see everyone through love, as Children of God created in his image and that we all need Christ.

*information in this blog is from Georges Houssney Engaging Islam.

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Soccer mom

Sometimes I find myself complaining about all the soccer training’s, mostly when it means I have to take kids, equipment and sit in traffic. Lately though I have been reminded that soccer is a main component of why we are in Uganda. It all started with a ball and a bunch of neighborhood boys who everyday would get together and play with a ball that was beat up, flat, or made of plastic bags. You see 9 years ago we came with a group of strangers and played games in the neighborhood we were staying in. We then decided that we would commit our two years in Uganda to stay in that very village that we gave a soccer ball to. It was the village ball; we gave that ball to a kid named “dudu” later we gave him jersey number 2 for obvious reasons. See, when we played games with these kids we were building community, we were building relationships. 9 years later we are still active in the lives of those very kids we met 9 years ago. Our ministry is complex a lot of times people overlook the importance that soccer brings. Without this aspect of outreach, we wouldn’t even be in existence. Don’t get me wrong, like I said our ministry is complex we use the love of the game to give opportunities in education and most importantly to show the love of Christ. When you build a relationship with someone and in this case with an entire community it allows you the opportunity to show Christ in real ways. Rising Star started out as just a fun thing to do with the kids in the neighborhood and now is an amazing ministry that has lead children to a relationship in Christ, scholarships to complete school, travels around Africa, ability to read and so much more. You see those days that I don’t want to lug equipment, sit around in the hot sun and cheer on the teams; I am reminded that all of this is worth it because this is what community building is.  “How good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in unity.” Psalm 133:1